Video

Dig into a strategy for establishing strong culture in remote classrooms, and set your remote classroom culture vision.

Visioning my Classroom Culture for my Remote Classroom

Click here to download the section to Word. 

Key Point

I need to think with the end in mind around my classroom culture. I do this by defining my vision and my criteria for success for my classroom culture.

This product should answer the questions, “What will my remote classroom culture be like in action if I do it well? What will it look like, sound like, and feel like?”

It is important to do this process specifically for a remote classroom. Even though kids are not in the same physical space, they still need to feel safe, seen, and valued to take risks with their learning. Teachers still have to cultivate this space even though they are not together in person.

 

Process

  1. Gather your school or district culture resources: this could include school rules, mission or vision statements, or any other key culture related documents, artifact, or handbook sections that are relevant. Reread these resources.
  1. Based on this list, and your own ideas, Brainstorm: make a list of what you want for your kids and the kind of culture you’ll need to build to make it happen
  1. Write a vision statement to sum up your brainstorm. What will your culture be like when it is at its best?
  1. Prioritize 3 adjectives from your brainstorm that you want to focus on building. This is how you’d want a student, family member, or stranger to describe your culture.
  1. Get more specific! Think about what you want it to look like, sound like, and feel like in action.

 

Classroom Culture Vision and Criteria for Success- Sample

My Vision Statement:

While kids will not be together in person, it is still crucial that they build relationships with each other and lean on each other to grow. They need to feel like they are in a safe space with people they know and trust so they are willing to push themselves and take risks. It is also important that kids learn life skills and social skills like active listening, taking feedback, independent work focus, problem solving, self-reflection, and kindness. While I will not be doing this work in person, I can still do it remotely.

 

3 adjectives I’d want someone to use to describe my class

Curious, focused, kind

 

When we are at our best, my class

  • Looks like
    • Students keeping their unique schedules
    • Students completing work on time
    • Active participation across all required tasks and platforms
    • Students respecting the norms we agree on for our digital participation
    • Community meeting engagement
    • Shared celebrations of goals
    • Students using feedback to improve
    • Student jobs that are unique for their strengths/ interests
  • Sounds like
    • Students greeting each other, asking how their peers are doing, and sharing stories about life
    • Students pushing each other to keep trying
    • Students owning their mistakes and apologizing or making repairs when needed
    • Students asking me and their peers for help
    • Student connecting with each other outside of scheduled course times
  • Feels like
    • Joy
    • Safe space where everyone’s voice is present
    • Growth

Remote Classroom Culture Vision and Criteria for Success- Template

Click here to download the section to Word. 

Use this template to create your own vision and criteria for success

  • Gather your school or district culture resources. This could include school rules, mission or vision statements, or any other key culture related documents, artifact, or handbook sections that are relevant. Reread these resources.
  • Based on this list, and your own ideas brainstorm, make a list of what you want for your kids and the kind of culture you’ll need to build to make it happen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Write a vision statement to sum up your brainstorm. What will your culture be like when it is at its best?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Prioritize 3 adjectives from your brainstorm that you want to focus on building. This is how you’d want a student, family member, or stranger to describe your culture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Get more specific! Think about what you want it to look like, sound like, and feel like in action.

Looks like

Sounds like

Feels like

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Keep it short and simple: you want something you can print, hang, keep in your binder, and reference throughout your year to self-assess how you are doing.