Video

Dig into best practice for setting expectations in remote classrooms, create a list of what expectations to teach, and a plan for how to teach them

Classroom Culture Vision in a Remote Classroom

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Criteria for Success- Example

My Vision Statement:

While kids will not be together in person, it is still crucial that they build relationships with each other and lean on each other to grow. They need to feel like they are in a safe space with people they know and trust so they are willing to push themselves and take risks. It is also important that kids learn life skills and social skills like active listening, taking feedback, independent work focus, problem solving, self-reflection, and kindness. While I will not be doing this work in person, I can still do it remotely.

 

3 adjectives I’d want someone to use to describe my class

Curious, focused, kind

 

When we are at our best, my class

  • Looks like
    • Students keeping their unique schedules
    • Students completing work on time
    • Active participation across all required tasks and platforms
    • Students respecting the norms we agree on for our virtual participation
    • Community meeting engagement
    • Shared celebrations of goals
    • Students using feedback to improve
    • Student jobs that are unique for their strengths/ interests
  • Sounds like
    • Students greeting each other, asking how their peers are doing, and sharing stories about life
    • Students pushing each other to keep trying
    • Students owning their mistakes and apologizing or making repairs when needed
    • Students asking me and their peers for help
    • Student connecting with each other outside of scheduled course times
  • Feels like
    • Joy
    • Safe space where everyone’s voice is present
    • Growth

Successfully Setting Remote Expectations

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When students know what to expect up front, they are much more likely to be successful. We owe it to students to set them up for success by clearly communicating what we expect. This is the case for distance learning settings just as much as it is the case for face to face lessons.

Successfully setting expectations including

  • Name it: Name and describe what the expectation looks and sounds like in action
  • Model it: Explicitly model doing the expectation successfully
  • Narrate it: Have students notice and narrate the specifics of the expectations during a teacher model and other students’ modeling
  • Practice it: Having students practice the expectation
  • Reinforce it: Notice when students are doing it successfully and name what specifically they are doing and the impact of it

 

Use this checklist to plan how you teach your expectations.

See below for a sample.

Sample:

Expectation

Be a respectful listener

Name and describe

  • Look at the person who is speaking
  • Hide your self-video (if your programs allows this) so you aren’t distracted by it
  • Show nonverbal signals like you would in person (nodding, hand signals, etc.)
  • Share when it’s your turn
  • If there is noise in your room, mute your microphone
  • At the beginning, position yourself so your face is in the camera and others can see all of your face

Model it

Actually demonstrate this on a video lesson. Come with a discussion question that is social in nature (something like which sports’ team do you think is best and why?)

Tell students to watch what you do during the discussion so they can narrate your moves.

Narrate it

After the model, have students name specifically what you did. Add anything that they missed that you need to call out.

Practice it

Plan a different discussion question and look for the same actions from students. This time you name and narrate what you see.

Reinforce it

Keep naming and narrating what you see as time goes on. The more you name it the more it will be normalized.

 

Planning Template:

Expectation

 

Name and describe

 

Model it

 

Narrate it

 

Practice it

 

Reinforce it

 

Remote Classroom Expectation

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Sample Expectations

Synchronous Lessons

Script It-what does it look and sound like?

Expectations for a synchronous lesson:

Before logging in, make sure you are in a quiet place where you can focus. Login, turn on your video, and mute your microphone. Look at the screen and unmute your microphone when it is your turn to speak.

Model It

Watch as I model our synchronous lesson expectations.

Narrate It

"I am getting ready for a synchronous lesson with my class. I need to take my laptop to my room where it is quiet and I can focus. I put the laptop on the dresser so my class and teacher can see me. I login, turn on my video, and mute my microphone. I stay looking at the screen.  When I am called on to speak, I unmute my microphone. “

Practice It

Let's practice our synchronous lesson expectations. I will call on students to practice the routine.

Reinforce It

I noticed Student A is in a quiet space where they can focus. I see Student B quickly unmuted his microphone when called on to speak.

Accommodations for a Hybrid Model

In-person students would be taught separate routines for in-person lessons, such as when to ask questions, how to interact with peers during direct instruction, where to sit, etc.  

 

Submitting Assignments

Script It-what does it look and sound like?

Submitting assignments:

In the Learning Management System, I will make sure my assignment is attached before clicking submit. I will save my assignment using [First name last name assignment name]. I will click submit and wait until I see the confirmation that my assignment has been submitted before logging out.

Model It

Watch as I model our expectation for submitting assignments.

Narrate It

"I have finished my assignment. I will save my assignment as [John Smith narrative essay]. I will attach my assignment, click submit, and wait for the confirmation my assignment has been submitted before logging out. "

Practice It

Let's practice our submitting assignment routine. Let’s submit our opinion writing activity from yesterday’s class. The assignment name is [opinion essay].

Reinforce It

I notice all students saved their assignment using [first name last name assignment name].

Accommodations for a Hybrid Model

For in-person students, submit your assignment to the Learning Management System using your laptop in class.

 

Asking a Question During a Synchronous Lesson

Script It-what does it look and sound like?

Asking a question during a synchronous lesson:

If you have a question, use the raise your hand function. Do not put your question in the chat. If your question cannot be answered right away, the teacher will let you know. Keep your microphone muted until the teacher calls on you to ask your question.

Model It

Watch as I model our routine for asking a question during a synchronous lesson.

Narrate It

"I have a question about what the teacher is teaching about fractions. I should click on the raise my hand function. I hear the teacher telling me she sees my hand is raised and will call on me in just a minute. I wait on mute until the teacher calls on me. I unmute my microphone, ask my question, and put my microphone back on mute."

Practice It

Let's practice our routine for asking a question during a synchronous lesson. Student A, B, and C, you will practice this expectation first.

Reinforce It

I notice Student A used the raise your hand function. I see Student B is keeping his microphone muted until I call on him.

Accommodations for a Hybrid Model

For in-person students, students will physically raise their hand to ask a question.