Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20.

 Expanded Standard header image

Cluster

Know number names and the counting sequence.

Click here to download the Instructional Focus Document for this standard.

Evidence of Learning Statements

Students with a level 1 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 2 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 3 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 4 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 5 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 6 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 7 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Print the distinctive features of a number but may not correctly form each number from 0 to 10. Reversal of a digit is acceptable.

Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-10 (may not be correctly formed) or select the correct number that represents the number of objects (e.g., show students a collection of items and have them match the appropriate numeral card with number of items in the set.).

Write numbers from 0 to 10.

Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0 to 10.

NOTE: Printed reversal of a digit is acceptable.

Write numbers from 0 to 20.

Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0 to 20.

NOTE: Printed reversal of a digit is acceptable.  Digits must be in the correct place value order. (e.g., 21 may not be accepted for 12).

Use a given printed number from 10 to 20 to correctly identify the number and represent the number with counters.

NOTE: Printed reversal of a digit is acceptable.  Digits must be in the correct place value order. (e.g., 21 may not be accepted for 12).

Use a given printed number from 10 to 20 and a partial collection of objects within 5 numbers below the given number to correctly identify the number and correctly represent the number with counters (e.g., teacher shows the number card 15 and 11 counters. The student identifies the number 15 and adds 4 more counters to make a collection of 15).

NOTE: Printed reversal of a digit is acceptable.  Digits must be in the correct place value order.  (e.g., 21 may not be accepted for 12).

Write numbers from 0 to 20 with no printed reversal of digits.

Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 with no printed reversal of digits.

Use a given a printed number from 10 to 20 and a partial collection of objects more than 5 numbers below the given number to correctly identify the number and correctly represent the number with counters. 

Use a given a printed number from 10 to 20 and a collection of objects that exceeds the given number by no more than 5 to correctly identify the number and correctly remove objects until the objects remaining represents the number. 

 

Use a given a printed number from 10 to 20 and a collection of objects that exceeds the given number by more than five to correctly identify the number and correctly remove objects until the objects remaining represents the number. 

 

Instructional Focus Statements

Level 3: 

Instruction for this standard should focus on developing a student’s ability to write the numerals from 0 to 20 while also connecting the written form to the number of objects represented by a group. Students need to first begin recognizing written numerals before they begin generating them on their own.  While they are learning what the written numerals look like, it is helpful for them to begin connecting this to the number of objects in a group. Students should be provided with a wide variety of opportunities to recognize written numerals. This can be accomplished in a variety of ways. One particularly helpful tool is a deck of cards where each card displays not only the printed number, but also a picture representing a count of that many objects. 

Once students are comfortable identifying written numerals, they progress to looking at a collection and matching the number of items in the collection with the appropriate count. Simultaneously, students should be given the opportunity to practice writing their numerals. This does not have to be strictly done with paper and pencil. There are many other tactile methods such as writing numbers in sand that will help solidify for students how to write numbers. It is important to note that it is developmentally appropriate for students to reverse digits. Giving students kinesthetic experiences where they can form numerals may help overcome this.  

Finally, instruction should focus on connecting the two skills: determining the number of objects in a group and providing a written numeral to represent the count. It is beneficial to teach this standard alongside standard K.CC.B.4 so that students count the objects and then represent what they have counted with a written numeral that they understand represents the number of objects in the group. It is important that students understand that the numeral is the written representation of a number.

Levels 4-7:

Once students understand the connection that exists between written numerals and the number of objects in a group, they should be able to extend their thinking to flexibly work with verbal, written, and concrete representations of numbers. One such way would be to identify when an incorrect count is given for the number of objects in a group. Once the mistake is identified, students should be able to correct the mistake in two different ways: write down a numeral to accurately represent how many items are in the group and correct the mistake by adjusting the group of objects so that it accurately represents the number of items that were initially incorrectly indicated to be in the group. It is important to push students thinking so that they seamlessly connect verbal, written, and concrete representations of numbers.