Count to 100 by ones, fives, and tens. Count backward from 10.

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Cluster

Know number names and the counting sequence.

Click here to download the Instructional Focus Document for this standard.

Evidence of Learning Statements

Students with a level 1 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 2 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 3 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 4 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 5 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 6 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Students with a level 7 understanding of this standard will most likely be able to:

 

Begin counting. Students are emergent counters at this level.

Students begin rote counting at 1 (or is directed by the teacher to start at 1) and count to any number less than 100. Some numbers in the number sequence may be out of order or skipped.

 

Count to 100 by ones, counts to 100 by fives, counts to 100 by tens, or counts backward from 10. A student should be able to complete two of the tasks. The others tasks a student may be able to start and only partially complete.

Count to 100 by ones, fives, and tens.

Count backward from 10 by ones.

Given a counting sequence by ones (starts at 1), identify at least three missing consecutive numbers (e.g., Identify missing numbers on a hundreds chart).

Count to 100 by ones, twos, fives, and tens.

Given a counting sequence by ones (starts at 1), identify at least three missing non-consecutive numbers (example-Identify missing numbers on a hundreds chart).

Given a counting sequence by tens (starts at 10), identify at least three missing consecutive numbers.

 

Count backward from 10 by ones and fives.

Given a counting sequence by ones (starts at 1), identify at least four non-consecutive missing numbers (example-Identify missing numbers on a hundreds chart).

Given a counting sequence by tens (starts at 10) identify at least three missing non-consecutive numbers.

Given a counting sequence by fives (starts at 5) identify at least three missing consecutive numbers.

 

Count to 100 by ones, twos, threes, fives, and tens.

Count backward from 10 by ones, fives, and twos.

Given a counting sequence by ones (starts at 1), identify at least five non-consecutive missing numbers.

Given a counting sequence by tens (starts at 10) identify at least four missing non-consecutive numbers.

Given a counting sequence by fives (starts at 5) identify at least three missing non-consecutive numbers.

Given a counting sequence by twos (starts at 2) identify at least three missing consecutive numbers.

 

Instructional Focus Statements

Level 3: 

Several progressions within the standards are grounded in students first knowing number names and counting sequences. Specifically, a conceptual understanding of counting and cardinality will be necessary before students can develop a deep conceptual understanding of specifically the standards within both the Operations and Algebraic Thinking (OA) and Numbers and Operations in Base Ten (NBT) domains throughout grades K through 2. 

That said, the instructional focus for standard K.CC.A.1 should initially be on having students count by ones over a small range of numbers. The range will increase over time depending on the needs of each individual student. It is helpful to associate number sequences with situations with which students are already familiar. Additionally, this standard provides an opportunity to bring literature into the classroom as there are many nursery rhyme and counting based books available.

As students begin to rote count more fluently, introducing them to the numeral representations for each number will allow more avenues for students to conceptually develop their understanding of the number system. Incorporating a hundreds chart when counting by ones offers a manipulative for students to connect the verbal and written forms of numbers. Additionally, it offers a very nice extension when students move to skip counting allowing students to discover the patterns that exist when skip counting by first tens and then by fives. It is important to note that a strong understanding of skip counting is foundational to students when they begin learning about multiplication in grade 3.

The goal for this standard is for students to count in these different ways by the end of the grade. These skills should develop over time due to the readiness of the student. The most natural progression is for students to count by ones, tens, fives, and then backwards. It is also important to note that it is not necessary for a student to completely master one prior to beginning to work with another.

This standard can integrate nicely with standard K.MD.B.3 where students learn to identify and understand the value of pennies, nickels, and dimes. Once students have developed a conceptual understanding of what the value of a coin is, these provide a manipulative that can be used with skip counting. One note of caution, the coins provide a manipulative that can be used but in doing so they do not necessarily reinforce a conceptual understanding of skip counting as students cannot see, for example, the five pennies that make up a nickel.

Students can usually say the counting words up to a given number before they use these numbers to count objects or to identify the number of objects in a group. Students become fluent in saying the counting sequence so that when instruction shifts to connecting counting to cardinality, they can focus on, for example, the one-to-one aspects of cardinality when instruction shifts to standard K.CC.B.4 without having to deeply focus on simply naming the numbers.

Levels 4-7:

As students demonstrate their ability to rote count in multiple ways, instruction should shift to provide multiple opportunities for students to interact with sequences that begins with the starting number in the counting sequence(1, 5, or 10) and have them identify missing numbers (both consecutive and non-consecutive) within the sequence. Hundred charts are a particularly helpful tool for this task. Additionally students can be challenged to skip count by other numbers.